thisbigcity:

nybg:

A Brief Survey of Vertical Gardens, Skyscrapers, and Edible Restaurants
Notice the bevy of green architectural concepts floating around the internet? I don’t mean the office building proposals with low carbon footprints, or novel approaches to solar farms. I’m talking about literal green concepts—bringing the bounty of the farm to urban landscapes.
Flavorwire has put together a stack of innovative and inspiring “plant buildings,” all with one thing in common: they’re taking after Patrick Blanc in a big way. Thanks to the French botanist’s Orchid Show designs here at the NYBG, New Yorkers are getting a taste of his creative ambition. The Green Man’s vertical gardens, or mur végétal, have directly or indirectly inspired everything from skyscraper farms to edible restaurants, and the author phrases Blanc’s legacy succinctly.

" … Our favorite green-haired botanist has helped to usher in the post-industrial era’s successor—a new design epoch that we think should be classified as The Age of the Plant."

Click through for a few of the more daring ideas being courted in countries around the world. —MN

How many of these ideas have been realized or are in the process of this? Any vertical gardens in your city?

thisbigcity:

nybg:

A Brief Survey of Vertical Gardens, Skyscrapers, and Edible Restaurants

Notice the bevy of green architectural concepts floating around the internet? I don’t mean the office building proposals with low carbon footprints, or novel approaches to solar farms. I’m talking about literal green concepts—bringing the bounty of the farm to urban landscapes.

Flavorwire has put together a stack of innovative and inspiring “plant buildings,” all with one thing in common: they’re taking after Patrick Blanc in a big way. Thanks to the French botanist’s Orchid Show designs here at the NYBG, New Yorkers are getting a taste of his creative ambition. The Green Man’s vertical gardens, or mur végétal, have directly or indirectly inspired everything from skyscraper farms to edible restaurants, and the author phrases Blanc’s legacy succinctly.

" … Our favorite green-haired botanist has helped to usher in the post-industrial era’s successor—a new design epoch that we think should be classified as The Age of the Plant."

Click through for a few of the more daring ideas being courted in countries around the world. —MN

How many of these ideas have been realized or are in the process of this? Any vertical gardens in your city?

biodiverseed:

Have you ever eaten okra, yams, millet, watermelon, sorghum, millet, collards, black-eyed peas, or drank a cup of coffee?

Then you have appreciated generations of agricultural selection that took place on the African continent.

Lost Crops of Africa: Volumes I-III

These readable and engaging books dispel myths, often based on Western bias, about the nutritional value, flavour, and yield of thousands of native African crops.

Designed as a tool for economic development, the volumes are organized with increasing levels of detail to meet the needs of both lay and professional readers. The authors present the available information on where and how each crop is grown, harvested, and processed, and they list its benefits and limitations as a food source.

Find it: Canada / USA / UK & Europe

I would very much like to give these a read!

——

(h/t to mamisgarden)

(via neallyeats)

africa crops